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Boars Head Tavern, Eastcheap Eastcheap

Boars Head Tavern, Eastcheap

Boars Head Tavern, Eastcheap

I have been working through the Taverns where the masonic lodges met, prior to 1791, or quite early anyway. I know it was destroyed in the Great fire of London, in 1666. It was also rebuilt, in about 1668.

You need to open some of these early mapping of London maps, I always start with that in 1799. This site is so amazing …..

In Maitlands survey of London in 1756 (references 1739), and states in Candlewick ward that  In this Street [Great East Cheap] is the Boar’s head Tavern, under the Sign of which is wrote, This is the oldest Tavern in London. It is in this Tavern where some of the Scenes of the Poet Shakespear’s Henry IV. are laid, which he introduces Prince Henry, Falstaff, his Companions.

There was a shortage of low denomination coinage in a particular period, and prior to 1672 a number of mainly farthing tokens exist – a farthing is a quarter of one old penny). There are two collections of these tokens, mainly held by the British museum, and they are well documented.

In Great Eastcheap, the Boars Head has at least two tokens in existence, they bear little detail apart from often, just the initials of the tenant, or in one case John Sapcott. The books describing the tokens often collect together much detail about a token, as it does here.

One of the places I found, which I have a lot of detail about on various sites, all in my search engine was the Boars Head Tavern, in Great Eastcheap.

Longford, the celebrated auctioneer, formerly of the great piazza, Covent Garden, announced for sale on May 28th, 1756, some leasehold messuages in St. Michael’s, Crooked lane, ” at the Boar’s Head tavern in Cannon street.”

Dr. Goldsmith appears to have written his Reverie in 1758, or early in the following year; but when John Carter drew and etched the Boar’s Head tablet, for Pennant’s Some Accownt of London, in 1790, the house had ceased several years before to be a temple of Bacchus.

The Boar’s Head tavern, a large house, was subsequently divided into two tenements, and constituted numbers 2 and 3, Great Eastcheap. The freehold was early in June, 1831, purchased by the Corporation, for the London Bridge improvements. The house was immediately demolished. The stone sign of the Boar’s Head, set up in 1668, and now in the museum attached to the Corporation library, Guildhall, immediately faced the house now number 65, King William street, a few feet westward of the statue of King William the Fourth, placed there in December 1844.

I have a number of addresses to describe where a Boars Head Tavern existed at about this time from these records.

In about 1770, the Caledonian Lodge, meets at the Boars Head, Eastcheap

Apparently, The Boar’s Head is first mentioned in the time of King Richard II., and Stow alludes to a riot that occurred there on St. John’s Eve, 1410, in which the Princes John and Thomas were mixed up.
The original Boar’s Head was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, and rebuilt on its old site within two years, as attested by a Boar’s Head cut in stone between the first-floor windows. This stone is now in the Guildhall Museum. The original house stood between Small Alley and St. Michael’s Lane ; and at the rear looked out into St. Michael’s Churchyard.

If 2 and 3 Cornhill is the correct address, this would equate to the area at the top of King William street (previously St Michaels Lane) where a statue of King William IV was erected in about 1845. This statue is later removed, around 1936, to Greenwich Park, where it can be seen today.

My additional detail:

The Boars Head is latterly in St Clements Eastcheap parish, but not to be confused with another Boars Head at 157 Cannon street (earlier address is 56 Cannon street before renumbering in about 1861. This was earlier called the Neighbours Tavern, as a John Neighbour had a coffee house here.

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html web editor

Update on web editor – write my own?

OK, I am onto step 3 of finding a decent web editor after having been a lazy frontpage editor for many years..It just works, although it does not have html5 tags, but this can be arranged.There is little on the market, well there are some great free editors, e.g. brackets; but it does not have a visual editor , so I cannot copy and paste a file of text into it, and see well formed html come out of the other end.I did find a work around using a blog, but this messes up all of the formatting, and is a mess to edit later on.So, I am back to a challenge I faced previously to be able to create some basic web pages from a bunch of text files, I guess I could write my own program in java. Or I could write a script in linux, I have done both before, and this seems to be a way forward.Or I could keep my 7 year old PC running in the background which has Frontpage 2007 still working, just about.You would think that the mighty software giants (apart from adobe, and dreamweaver -which is incredibly expensive) would have something better than notepad++ ??I like a challenge.Whatever, sorry if you don’t know what I am talkinmg about, just thinking aloud.

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Essex pubs Hanningfield

Dry pub crawl in Essex – the Hanningfields

I have been meaning to visit the Hanningfields for some time now. Here is the plan:

Looking for the Plough & Sail, Southend road, East Hanningfield CM3 8EE which is apparently more in Rettendon. This is the road between Battlesbridge and Great Baddow, i.e. the A130. This is a major dual carriageway now, so I think I will see if I can avoid this road.

Then there is the Three Horseshoes, The Tye, East Hanningfield CM3 8AF which is in East Hanningfield village. This is to the east of the A130, heading towards Bicknacre. This is close to the Windmill, The Tye, East Hanningfield, Chelmsford CM3 8AA.

Moving on to West Hanningfield, we have the :

Ivy House, Church road, West Hanningfield CM2 8UJ – probably a private residence now. And Three Compasses, Church road, West Hanningfield CM2 8UQ which is probably still open. It is north of the reservoir.

Leather Bottle, West Hanningfield CM2 – not sure where this was. The Ship, Stock road, West Hanningfield CM2 8LB ; this is west of Hanningfield at the junction with Ship road and closer to Stock. Turning north from here goes to Galleywood across the A12.

And we have the Old Windmill, South Hanningfield Road, South Hanningfield CM3 8HT which was a Brunning and Price pub in 2017. It is south of the reservoir.

Here are early mappings from the NLS site which are less interactive than google maps but easier to follow on a mobile, I think. It is really interesting to see the 1892 to 1914 map which shows this as farmland rather than a reservoir, when was it built? Apparently in 1957, that’s history.

So, which is the best way to travel? Here is my list of Essex pubs, by the way. In Bicknacre, which is east of here, is the Brewers Arms, Main road, Bicknacre CM3 4HD and the White Swan, Main road, Bicknacre CM3 4EX a bit further north. Both of these appear to exist still.

Further south on the way here is Ramsden Bellhouse.This includes the Fox & Hounds, Church Road, Ramsden Heath, Billericay CM11 1PW north of the village. The Nags Head, 50 Heath Road, Ramsden Heath, Billericay CM11 1HS west of the village, and the White Horse, Heath Road, Ramsden Heath, Billericay,CM11 1NA in the Ramsden Heath village itself. To get to Ramsden Bellhouse and Heath we travel directly north from Crays Hill, I know this, as it is just off of the A127 before getting to Wickford and the A130.

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1756 html Survey of London

Survey of London 1756 index

The Survey of London in 1756 was written by William Maitland, and based on Stows survey of 1733, with additional detail.

I am attempting to find a decent web editor to replace the functionality I used to have with Frontpage, or Sharepoint designer as it became. This is no longerr available and there is nothing of similar design that I can find.

Microsoft have given up on building decent software, well they probably stole the software, but they did support it for many years. Their office package is not worth sitgning up for, as it offers nothing of particular use, and therefore I am looking for a non-Microsoft package, or anything which does what I need.

This wordpress may offer a simple solution.

I am not amiss to sepnding money, as the web sites I have, already cost me over £50 a month to run on their shared server which I purchase / rent.

They are fairly decent sites, including the pubwiki and the londonwiki sites, and a number of others.

Anyway, here is a go at the index of the survey of London in 1756.

Chap. I. The Situation, Extent, Number of houses, and Division into eight general Parts.

Chap. II. An Account of the Alleys, Banks, Bridges, Buildings, Buries, closes, Corners, Courts, Ditches, Docks, Entries, Gardens, Greens, Grounds, Mewses, Passages, Rents, Roads, Rows, Squares, Streets, Yards, &c. within the City of London, and Suburbs thereof, alphabetically digejled.

Chap. III. Divers Accounts of the Bills of Mortality, shewing the great Increase of the City, with the Number of its nhabitants.

Chap. IV. Certain Parallels between London and divers other great Cities, both ancient and modern,

Chap. V. An Account of divers Sorts of Provisions wherewith the City is supplied.

Chap. VI. Of Aldersgate Ward. Ihe Antiquity of Wards. The Bounds of Aldersgate Ward within and without. Number of Parishes and Parish Churcbes. The ancient and modern State of this Ward. Halls and other publick Buildings. The State of the Lying in Hospital for married Women. The Liberty of St. Martin’s le grand, its Privileges, and some Observations thereon.

Chap. VII. Aldgate Ward. The Etymology and Bounds of Aldgate Ward. The ancient and present State. Priory of the Holy Trinity. The Papey. The Portugueze Jews Synagogue. Crutched Friars. Sir John Milburn’s Charity. Parishes and Churches. Navy Office, Halls and other publick Buildings, and ancient Monuments. Alderman and Common council.

Chap. VIII. Basinghall, or BafFishaw Ward. The Situation and Bounds of Basinghall Ward. Whence it takes its Name. Its present State and Government. Remarkable Things therein. Of Blackwell hall, Masons hall, Girdlers hall, Weavers hall, and their Charter from K.H. II.

Chap. IX. Billingfgate Ward. Situation, Bounds, and Contents of Billingfgate Ward. Whence it derives its Name. Parishes and Parish Churches. Government and present State. Billingsgate Market. Keys or Docks. Butchers hall, fire of London. Antiquities.

Chap. X. Bishopsgate Ward. Its Name, Bounds, and Extent. Its present State. Parishes. The Artillery ground. St. Mary Spittle. Devonshire houie. Clerks hall. Leatherfellers hall, Crosby square. South Sea house, Gresham College

Chap. XI. Bread street Ward. Derivation of its Name. Bound . Present State. Parishes and Churches. Cordwainers hall. Gerard’s hall Inn. Compter removed. Acl of Common council. Goldsmiths row.

Chap. XII. Of Bridge Ward within. Its Name. Whence derived. Its Bounds and present State. Parishes and Churches. London Bridge. Water Machine. Fishmongers hall. The Monument. The Black Prince’s Palace. Alderman and Common Council.

Chap. XIII. Of Broad street Ward. The Derivation of its Name. Bounds and Contents. Present State. Alderman and Common Council. Winchester Place. St. AugustinV Priory. The Dutch Church. The French Church. Scalding house. Carpenters, Drapers, Merchant taylors, and Pinners Halls. The Bank of England, and Directors. Ihe South Sea house, Company and Directors. The Pay office, Gresham Almshouse, and the Ward school.

Chap. XIV. Of Candlewick Ward. Its Name, Bounds, and Extent. Modern State. Alderman and Common Councilmen. Parijhes and Parish
churches. A French Episcopal Church. Two Colleges. The Poet Lidiats Account of East cheap.

Chap. XVI. Cheap Ward. Its Name. Bounds and Extent. Modern State. The Alderman and Common Councilman. Remarkable Things. Parishes and Churches. The Guild hall. Guildhall chapel. Mercers hall and Chapel. Grocers hall. Poultry compter. Cometh Tower. Standard, Cross and Conduit in Cheapside.

Chap. XVII. Coleman street Ward. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State. Alderman and Common council, &c. Remarkable Things. Parishes and Churches. Armourers and Brasiers hall. Founders hall, and Scotch Kirk. Excise office. Commissioners and Officers. Antiquities. First Jews Synagogue. Friars de Pcenitentia. Prince’s Wardrobe.

Chap. XVIII. Of Cordwainers street Ward. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State. Alderman and Common council. Parishes and Churches. Roman Causeway.

Chap. XIX. Of Cornhill Ward. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State. Alderman and Common Councilmen. Churches and Parishes. Royal Exchange. Royal Exchange Assurance office. Great Fire in Cornhill, 1747. King John’s Court. Tun and Conduit, and the Standard

Chap. XX. Of Cripplegate Ward. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State, Government, Alderman and Common Council. Parishes and Churches. Lamb’s Chapel, Sion College and Alms houses. Barbers hall, Haberdashers hall, Waxchandlers hall, Plasterers hall, Brewers hall, Curriers hall, Loriners hall. Alms houses. Antiquities.

Chap. XXI. Of Dowgate Ward. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Government. Alderman and Common Council. Parifies and Churches. Watermans hall. Skinners hall. Tallow chandlers hall. Innholders hall. Joyners hall. Plumbers hall. Steel yard. Merchant taylors school. Antiquities. Jesus Commons. Conduit. Cold Harbour.

Chap. XXII. Of Faringdon Ward within. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State. Government. Alderman and Common Council. Parishes
and Churches. Companies Halls. St. Paul’s School. College of Pbysicians. Christ’s Hospital.

Chap. XXIII. Of Faringdon Ward without. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State. Government. Alderman, Common Councilmen. Division. Remarkable Things. Parishes and Churches. The Temple and Temple Church. The Rolls Chapel. Barnards Inn. Thave’s Inn. Cliffords Inn. Serjeants Inn, Six Clerk’s office. Bridewell and Bartholomew’s Hospital. Smithfield. Fleet Market, and Prison. Old bailey. Semons house. Surgeons hall. Temple bar. Antiquities. White friars.

Chap. XXIV. Of Langbourn Ward, and Penny about. Its Name. Extent. Modern State. Government. Alderman and Common Councilmen. Parishes and Churches. Hudfon’s bay hall. Pewterers hall. General Post office. Antiquities. Dif charge from Fifteenths

Chap. XXV. Lime street Ward. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State. Alderman and Common Councilmen. Leaden hall. East India house. Antiquities.

Chap. XXV. Portfoken Ward. Its Name. Bounds. ancient State. Extent. Modern State. Government. Aldermen and Common Councilmen. Parishes and Churches. Priory of the Holy Trinity St. Catherine’s Trinity Church and Canons. East Smithfield. New abby. Minories. Goodman’s fields. Nunnery of St. Clare.

Chap. XXVI. Of Queenhithe Ward. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State. Government. Alderman and Common Councilmen. Parishes and
Churches. Painter Stainers and Blackfmiths halls. Lutheran Church. Queenhithe. Wharfs. Antiquities.

Chap. XXVII. Of Tower street Ward. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State. Government. Remarkable Things. Parshies and Churches. The Tower of London. The Custom house. The Clothworkers hall. The Bakers hall. The Trinity house. Antiquities,

Chap. XXVIII. Of Vintry Ward. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State. Alderman and Common Councilmen. Parishes and Churches.
Vintners hall, &c. Antiquities. Whittington’s College. Tower Royal, &c.

Chap. XXIX. Of Walbrook Ward. Its Name. Bounds. Extent. Modem State. Government. Alderman and Common Councilmen. Parishes and
Churches.

BOOK III.

An Account of the ancient and present State of the several Parishes within the City and Liberties of London, alphabetically digested.

BOOK IV.
Containing the Civil, Ecclesiastical, and Military

Government.
Chap. I. An Account of the Civil Government, by Portreves, Bailiffs, and Mayors ; with a Lift of the latter. p. 1191

Chap. II. An Account of the City Representatives in Parliament, with a Lift of them. p. 1196
Chap. III. An Account of the Aldermen and Sheriffs, tenth a Lift of the latter. p. 1199
Chap. IV. An” Account of the several Courts within the City and Liberties of London. p. 1208
Chap. V. An Account of the Settling the Christian Religion in London ; with the Progress thereof under divers of its Bishops. p. 1214
Chap. VI. An Account, of the Military Government of London. p. 1226

BOOK V.
Containing an Account of the City Incorporations, its Commerce, and the several Offices, &c. thereon depending.

Chap. I. An Account of the several Incorporations of the Arts and Mysteries of the Citizens of London, the twelve first whereof are set down according to Precedence, and the others in alphabetical Order digested, with their respeclive Numbers, shewing their several Degrees of Preeminence, p. 1232

BOOK VI.

Containing an Account of the several Schools, Societies, Libraries, Inns of Court, Courts of Justice, Colleges, Hospitals, and Alms houses within the City and Suburbs of London.

Chap. I. An Account of the Free and Charity Schools within the Bill of Mortality, p. 1274
Chap. II. Of the Inns of Court. p. 1278
Chap. III. Of the Courts of Juftice. p. 1279
Chap. IV. An Account of Societies, Colleges and Libraries within the City and Suburbs of London. p. 1282
Chap. V. Of the Publick Libraries. p. 1286
Chap. VI. An Account of the several Hospitals and Alms houses within the Cities and Suburbs of London, p. 1288
Chap. VII. Of the Manner of Living, and modern Diversions used by the Citizens. p. 1326

BOOK VII.

Containing the History, Antiquities and Government of Westminfter, both Ecclesiastical and Civil, with a Description of the several Parishes, and other Things remarkable within the City and Liberty thereof.

Chap. I. An Account of the Foundation of the Abbey of Westminster, with the Construction of the present Church. p. 1327
Chap. II. An Account of the Suppression of the Abbey, the converting the same into a Bishoprick, and then into a Collegiate Church. p. 1329
Chap. III. The most remarkable Mo umental Inscriptions in the Collegiate Church Of St. Peter, p. 1330
Chap. IV. An Account of the events Parishes within the City and Liberty of Westminfter. P 1334

BOOK VIII.

Containing an Account of the Ancient and present State of the several Parishes and Liberties in the County of Middlesex within the Bill of Mortality, with an ample Defcription of the Remarkables now therein. p. 1350

BOOK IX.

Containing the Ancient and present State of the Borough of Southwark, &c. with an ample Description of the several Parishes, and Remakables at present, alphabetically digested.

I have just added this page to the Londonwiki site, that was nice and easy

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A simple html editor!

The history and survey of London - from its foundation to the present time (1756) (14753817226)

The site is being setup so that I can test it as an html editor. This is just a bunch of text, nothing particularly special.
I need to copy and paste text, and the occasional image onto blank page, and see formatting added, i.e. the line breaks, etc.
That’s it really.

To see the code, select the ellipsis at the top right corner and select code editor, rather than visual editor. This shows the code. Some of the items are a bit weird, e.g. the <br data-rich-text-line-break=”true” /> entries rather than just <br>

Broad street ward in 1756

Bishopsgate Ward in 1756

Bishopsgate Ward in 1756

Plan neatly engraved from a New Survey.

The, Name. Bounds. Extent. Modern State. Aldermen and Common Councilmen. Churches and Parishes. Royal Exchange. Royal Exchange Assurance Office. Great Fire in Cornhill, 1747. King Johns Court. Tun and Conduit, and the Standard.

This Ward also takes its Name from the principal Street therein, which was called Cornhill, from the Corn market kept there in ancient Times; and is bounded on the East by Bishopsgate Ward ; on the North by Broad Street Ward ; on the West by Cheap Ward ; and on the South by Langborn Ward. But it is of a very small Extent ; for beginning, on the North East, at the South East Corner of St. Martin Outwich’s Church, it runs, in several Windings South West, to the West Extent of Cornhill.
Then beginning again on the North at about 50 feet from the South West Corner of Bishopsgate street; it runs South to St. Peter’s alley in Gracechurch street, and from hence by divers to the South West Corner of Cornhill street.